Art Charm/Swap Auction to Benefit Beads of Courage 2013

Hearts-Blue-Chicks2

Hearts-Blue-Chicks2

It’s that time of year again:
Beads of Courage is a non-profit organization that provides art beads to children that are seriously ill. I first heard of Beads of Courage about 5 years ago when I hosted a bead swap for my bead group. I believe that this organization is unique in using art beads as a creative outlet for chronically ill children. So, when I heard of Jennifer’s “Art Charm Swap/Auction” for Beads of Courage, I felt that I wanted to be a part of it. I liked the idea of participating in a global art charm swap that would benefit children.

To read more about Beads of Courage
http://www.beadsofcourage.org/

Beads of Courage Auction Link
http://myworld.ebay.com/glassaddictions

The auction is November 15-17

The theme is love for this art charm swap:

I think of children and I think of love, and I believe Jesus knew children loved wholeheartedly without reserve. I am often reminded of His words “whoever does not receive the kingdom of God as a little child will by no means enter it.” And He took them up in His arms, laid His hands on them, and blessed them. Children love in an uncomplicated manner, their love is not jaded, and their love is transparent. It’s as close as unconditional love as one can get when they have the love of a child.

I went to a picnic; I didn’t know anyone there. I was invited by someone that saw I was new to the area. I was feeling very awkward, and most of the adults were hanging with their friends. They didn’t have time for anyone new. I was standing there by myself, and a small child walked over and said “Hi what’s your name?” They told me their name, the name of their dog, their favorite color, and asked me if I had a boy or girl? A small child saw me, an adult standing in a crowded room trying to connect with the adults who had friends and no time for anyone else. We sat there and talked and even played a guessing game. Children are willing to take the risk to reach out in friendship. That’s what love does.

Hearts

Links to Bead swap artists blogs:

Jen Cameron: http://glassaddictions.com/blog/
Toltec Jewels: http://www.jewelschoolfriends.com
Caroline Dewison: http://blueberribeads.co.uk
Lesley Watt: http://www.thegossipinggoddess.blogspot.com
Susan Kennedy: http://www.suebeads.blogspot.com
Nancy Dale : http://www.nedbeads.blogspot.com
Alicia Marinache: http://www.allprettythings.ca
Cassi Paslick: http://cassisbeads.blogspot.com
Alenka Obid: http://www.pepita-handmade.blogspot.com
Renetha Stanziano: http://www.lamplightcrafts.blogspot.com
Shelley Graham Turner: http://www.shelleygrahamturner.blogspot.com
Monique Urquhart: http://ahalfbakednotion.blogspot.com
Shai Williams: http://shaihasramblings.blogspot.com
Lennis Carter: http://windbent.wordpress.com
Cheri Reed: http://creativedesignsbycheri.blogspot.com
Moriah Betterly: http://mlbetterly.blogspot.com
Perri Jackson: http://shaktipajdesigns.com/blog/
Mallory Hoffman: http://rosebud101-fortheloveofbeads.blogspot.com
Ginger Bishop: http://lilmummylikes.blogspot.com
Jean Peter: http://jeanpdesigns.blogspot.com
Linda Florian: http://lilysofthevalleyjewelry.blogspot.com
Patricia Pulliam: http://rusticstudio.blogspot.com
Karin Grosset Grange: http://ginkgoetcoquelicot.blogspot.fr
Julie Bowen: http://blog.autochthonous-evolved.com
Susan Delaney: http://ladyflowersbysusan.wordpress.com
Emma Todd: http://www.apolymerpenchant.blogspot.com
Carolyn Chenault : http://carolynchenault.wordpress.com
Terri Del Signore: http://artisticaos.blogspot.com
Cory Tompkins: http://www.tealwaterdesigns.blogspot.com
Cheryl (Lee) Koopman: http://stregajewellry.wordpress.com
Lori Bowring Michaud: http://artfullyornamental.blogspot.com
Andrea Glick: http://zenithjade.blogspot.com
Jacqueline Carlson: http://www.beadgypsy.blogspot.com
Michelle McCarthy: http://www.fireflydesignstudio.blogspot.com
Charlene Bausinger Jacka: http://clay-space.com/blog/
Kristi Bowman: http://dreamsomedesigns.blogspot.com

22 Responses

  1. Lee says:

    Children are so often much wiser than adults, maybe because they are ore “tuned in ” to emotions and less preoccupied by everyday stressors and worries and making an impression on other people. What a great story and what a wise child. Love that little “chirp” charm! Adorable!

    • flowergurl says:

      Yes, it was sad. The joy of that day was the lesson I learned. I am aware of new people or people that are alone in a crowd. Visitors at church, a new neighbor, and especially people that don’t know any one at parties. I now am the one who will walk over and say “Hi what’s your name?”

  2. Julie Bowen says:

    What a sweet story, Vanessa! I think the sensitivity that makes that story so special also shows in the crisp and colorful details of your charms. Both versions are absolutely wonderful. I’m sure the ladies that were lucky enough to get one love them!

  3. Cassi says:

    That is a very sweet story. That loving age of innocence is a wonderful time. Your polymer clay work is really amazing –I love both your charms.

    • flowergurl says:

      Hi Cassi,

      Thanks for your kind words. Just so you know those charms are made of stoneware clay. I just decided to use acrylic paint and a varnish sealer.

  4. I was one of the lucky gals who received a sweet birdie and I am so thrilled, Vanessa. He is perfect, down to the tiny heart flower stamped on the back. Thank you for sharing your talents with us!

  5. flowergurl says:

    I was going to post individual comments, but I have so many blogs to visit and leave comments. So, I’m just going to say thanks for all your kind, and encouraging words.

  6. Alenka says:

    What a nice story – it gives us a lot to think about!!!
    I have not received your charms, but I love both of them – the heart and the little bird!

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